Where you stay?: Locals, Teachers, and Local Teachers

“Residential Distribution of Public School Teachers, 1931-32” An article that appeared in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin on August 25, 1932 reported that “Teachers Live Away from Homes of School Children.”  The article showed a chart that supported this gripping news and reported the following facts: The majority of teachers lived in Nu‘uanu, Makiki, Mānoa, Waikīkī and…

“Doing Our Duty”

Fewer than twenty women were surrounded by several dozen servicemen at this celebration – a party or a dance organized for members of the 33rd Infantry “Prairie Division.” Several of the girls look happy to be providing a pleasant diversion for the soldiers. Some are surrounded by several men, others stand off to the side.…

Who Was Zonita Owens?

It’s difficult to avoid getting caught up in the details of the lives of the students who wrote the papers in the RASRL Collection. It could be a compelling narrative that is particularly well written or the careful delineation of feelings or reactions that makes a paper memorable.  Sometimes it is simple curiosity:  who are you…

Student Life, Casual Segregation, and Informal Prejudices

Hawaii’s public schools were unofficially segregated for most of the Territorial Era, from the 1920s to the 1950s. Under pressure from a growing number of White migrants, the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) implemented a program of selective admissions based on English language abilities. English Standard Schools (ESS) were open to students who could pass…